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Category Archives: London

Ancestry Central launch Services for Family History and One Name Study Societies

As web site http://www.ancestrycentral.co.uk continues to develop, Ancestry Central have launched a number of opportunities for Family History and One Name Study Societies.
At Ancestry Central, we are committed to providing a platform for new collections of genealogical data and imagery for researchers worldwide and we invite Family History and One Name Study Societies to get involved by adding their listings to our directory pages and by contributing to collections on display.
Currently we aim to add more of our own collections, in particular of Headstones and Monuments as well as Church Images. Later we hope to include articles and images relating village history, wedding group photographs, old documents and maps. In fact , anything that is of genealogical interest and can be displayed in the current format of the web page.
A short presentation is available here .
For more information, please contact me


An experienced Researcher and Investigator (UK) offering specialist services to descendants of families originating in the United Kingdom. Offering a special emphasis on Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and Lancashire, I can research your ancestors from any region of England, Scotland and Wales providing all available personal details for your family tree. As well as being a member of the Society of Genealogists, I am also a member of several other UK based Family History Societies.
For more information Family Tree Services or any other Family History advice, please contact me. danny.billington

The Genealogist - UK census, BMDs and more online

 

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a job, a job , my kingdom for a job !!!!

Our language is changing almost every day and what means one thing today meant something completely different to our ancestors. Occupations are a great example of that , for example take a look at this list of 10:

Carrier – I always think this conjures up an image of Typhoid Mary when I see it but it is in fact a person who had some sort of transport (normally horse drawn) that enabled them to move goods from one place to another. As transport became heavier and it was hauled from place to place – this eventually became what we know today as ‘Haulier’
Cottager – is an interesting one because it is mostly used to mean an agricultural worker living in property provided by his employer but it also has another application, and was often used to describe a coal merchant who had reached a certain level of success and bought his own property , usually a cottage – hence the phrase.
Currier – sounds like a modern day version of Carrier or someone who works with spices but it is in fact a groomer of animals, one who pays particular attention to the coat – normally of a horse but was also applied to the preparation of animal skins and hides in the manufacturing of goods.
Fell Monger – today we use the phrase monger to express an occupation involved in sales or promotion; Fish , Scare or War Monger for example. Fell is an old Norse word that broadly means ‘of the mountain’ and a Fell Monger was typically a dealer in animal hides and skins (of wild animals).
Hawker – Simply a Peddler or street seller, who carried his wares with him. Often used as a term of abuse.
Husbandman – One of the logical ones I think, and today it is applied to animals mostly; animal Husbandry for example- animal care. In days gone by this would have been in area of great open space, a farm – husbandman is a word used to describe a farmer and since this was largely the domain of a man – the name ‘Husband’ has the same origins and it is another word deriving from the Norse language. Husbandman the name applied to a farmer, often dealing with animals.
Journeyman – there is a certain irony in this word, especially given that today’s training institutes measure the achievements of trainees in distance travelled. A journeyman was someone experienced in a certain occupation and who had served his time, and his apprenticeship – a Journeyman.
Wagonette Proprietor – at the turn of the 20th century as opportunities were presented to people and ownership of certain things and buildings was acquired– the word proprietor was applied to that ownership. In this case it meant the owner of a Wagonette, a small horse drawn carriage with seats facing sideways behind the driver – similar to the layout of a Tube Train – though clearly more hygienic !!!. These were mostly used to transport family mourners to a funeral.
Victualler – today we associate this phrase with the licensee of an establishment that sells alcoholic beverages. The term Victualler was used to describe a person who sold food and other items, even a grocer. Later in the Victorian era the name became synonymous with the provision of products to the Royal Navy.
Yeoman – is used to describe a farmer with a small landed estate, a minor land owner, one step down from ‘Gentry’ and one who is entitled to serve on Juries and vote on county issues.

If you need an answer about any occupation of the past, please email me.

For more information about how I can help you with your family search, please contact me


An experienced former Government Researcher and Investigator (UK) offering specialist services to descendants of families originating in the United Kingdom. Offering a special emphasis on Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and Lancashire, I can research your ancestors from any region of England, Scotland and Wales providing all available personal details for your family tree. As well as being a member of the Society of Genealogists, I am also a member of several other UK based Family History Societies.
For more information Family Tree Services or any other Family History advice, please contact me. danny.billington

 

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All in a week’s work

Last week was another hectic one in the life of Ancestry Central with some time spent in London at the LMA researching British Citizens born abroad between 1836-1907 which will form part of my article for Family Tree Magazine’s November issue.
Aside from that I have been photographing more cemeteries, with the addition now of Monumental Stones from St Mary’s,Hemingbrough, Yorkshire , Air Street, Kingston Upon Hull, Yorkshire and Sculcoates North, also in Kingston Upon Hull, Yorkshire. These older cemeteries can be a challenge, as in some case, there is a deal of clearing to be done by removing and climbing through an amount of thorny undergrowth and not always with successful results. Great fun none the less. As yet, I am still not sure how I am going to display all of these but anyone wishing to contact me about them , please do so. In the meantime, a brief selection can be found here.

Additionally I have been researching 3 or 4 trees in the Lincolnshire, Lancashire and Yorkshire areas, exploring newspapers records, parish records and directories on behalf of my clients. Each one of them providing me with something interesting , which I have to say, is always the case. The work is so absorbing.
On a personal note , I have been researching Court Documents and Newspaper articles relating to one of my own ancestors. The tale of which I have since written up and submitted to a few select Family History Magazines for inclusion in their future issues. So fingers crossed.
All in a week’s work……..


An experienced former Government Researcher and Investigator (UK) offering specialist services to descendants of families originating in the United Kingdom. Offering a special emphasis on Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and Lancashire, I can research your ancestors from any region of England, Scotland and Wales providing all available personal details for your family tree. As well as being a member of the Society of Genealogists, I am also a member of several other UK based Family History Societies.
For more information Family Tree Services or any other Family History advice, please contact me. danny.billington

 

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Cemetery Images for Free

I have started to place just a few of the several hundred images of Heads stones I have online at Flckr. You can use these images for FREE providing they are for personal use and not commercial.
I am about to lose space, so if you think one of the people might be yours – get there quick:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ancestrycentral/sets/72157626628816782/
Please note this is a small collection of what I have from the following cemeteries, so why not contact me and check.
Don’t worry if not , they will be re launched elsewhere very soon.
I have Random images from
Ambleforth, North Yorkshire
Billingborough, Lincolnshire
Burton Pedwardene, Lincolnshire
Chorley main,Lancashire
Chorley St Laurence,Lancashire
Elloughton, East Yorkshire
Goxhill, Lincolnshire
Grimsby Scartho , Lincolnshire
Heckington Cemetery , Lincolnshire
Heckington St Andrews , Lincolnshire
Helmsley, North Yorkshire
Helpringham, Lincolnshire
Horbling, Lincolnshire, East Yorkshire
Hull Eastern, East Yorkshire
Hull Hedon Road, East Yorkshire
Hull Jewish, East Yorkshire
Hull Myton Street East Yorkshire
Hull Spring Bank (Old) East Yorkshire :
Hull Western, East Yorkshire
Kirkby Moorside, North Yorkshire
Little Hale, Lincolnshire
Newton Heath, Manchester,Lancashire
Olswaldkirk, North Yorkshire
Sheffield General, West Yorkshire (now South)

Details of names uploaded so far:
Ampleforth; Garbutt, Knowlson,Thompson,

Billingborough; Almond, Bailey, Baily,
Chorley Main, Brewer, Brown , Chorlton, Lister, Withnell,
Chorley St Laurence; Swift
Elloughton; Jefferson
Goxhill; Bennett, Hess, Lepird, Mathias, McPherson, Neave, Peterson, Vrabel, ( this are in the set RAF Goxhill)
Hull Eastern; Bell, Hibbard, Routledge Cross,
Hull Spring Bank (Old):Brown, Clayton, Dearlove, Dolby, Fountain,Gath, Hellyer,Myers, Pawson, Stephenson,
Hull (Hedon Raod) Archer,Brown, Dawson, Huyton,
Hull Myton Street, Hall
Kirby Moorside, Simpson, Webb,
Newton Heath, Partington,

Sheffield General: Barnes, Nicholson, Richards, Taylor,

Dan


An experienced former Government Researcher and Investigator (UK) offering specialist services to descendants of families originating in the United Kingdom. Offering a special emphasis on Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and Lancashire, I can research your ancestors from any region of England, Scotland and Wales providing all available personal details for your family tree. As well as being a member of the Society of Genealogists, I am also a member of several other UK based Family History Societies.
For more information Family Tree Services or any other Family History advice, please contact me. danny.billington

 

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Leaving Home, A Historical Journey.

‘Dairy of a Family Tree Researcher’

My Journey to London by train is always steeped in my own personal history, even when I am researching for other families. Today will be no exception, and I have scheduled a sufficient local visits to keep me busy for the whole day.

A March day full of sunshine , leaving home to walk to the Railway station, the air , as always, was filled with ancestors past and as I walked through my local park. My Maternal Great Grandfather worked in the Dock Timer Yard, which in it’s heyday had be sited close to where my home is today and as I walked the cobbled street of the City’s old town, I passed the building that , until the early 1900’s, had been a Shoe Makers run by my Paternal Ancestors for several generations.

Ancestral connections throughout my journey would not stop there, as the train departed I could see the church in which my Maternal Great Grandparents were married and the area in which their daughter’s future husband was born during a dirigible air raid during the Great War. There were many more connections during a journey that took me in the direction of my sister’s birth place but today’s journey was not about my ancestors.

Arriving in London, my first stop was the Holborn Library in Camden Town, the staff there were so friendly and helpful, I had almost forgotten I was in London. My aim had been to examine some 1961 copies of the Hampstead and Highgate Express, the Hampstead News and the Kilburn Times. I already had some information from the Times Archives and just wanted to supplement it. The quality of what I could find turned out to be top notch and all the staff continued to be very helpful.
Next it was onto the National Portrait Gallery via the office of the Society of Genealogists to collect some research information. The National Portrait Gallery was a little disappointing, a series of related images had been prepared for me to view and as it was , all but one, we already had, and even that was a side elevation of one we did have !

Finally time to meet up with a Colleague from Nova Scotia, Canada and lunch at Sergio’s on Titchmarsh Street. We spent a pleasant couple of hours discussing Anglo Canadian Connections and agreed to meet up gain next time at Pier 21 in Halifax. A Plate of pasta and a glass of wine later, and once more I entered into the breach.
My first two stops in the afternoon were sites of old the London Work Houses, Wallis Yard and Mount Street in the St Georges and Hanover Square district. Each visit had a different history , but each equally important to their descendants and in both cases, in some kind of quirk of irony, the districts that once was home for some of the most poverty stricken of our Victorian ancestors, now represent the very opposite. In both cases the districts now house high class fashion houses, the best hotels and most exclusive private clubs , the most fashionable of eateries and the streets are littered with the most expensive of motor vehicles.

Mount Street was my first visit and I discovered the building to have all but disappeared. Rebuilt on the site had been Council Offices, which have now become the work places and apartments of wealthy businesses and the location had been renamed Charles Place and then Carlos Place, as it is today. Perhaps to fit in with the Sebastian’s and Tarquin’s now frequenting the area. Despite this, I believe traces of the work house are visible from the front of the building , those chimneys certainly don’t match the period and the rear the building still resembles a classic work house.
I could not say the same for my visit to Wallis Yard, not only renamed but it would seem to have been completely eradicated once and for all.

In regard to my work house visits, I cannot help a but have slight feeling of disgust for something I am finding a little unpalatable. I mentioned before that my two visits had been connected to different history’s. One of them had been an employee of the work house and the other had fallen on hard times, had more than her share of bad luck and this had been the only course to ensure her survival but ensure it she did , and her descendents were born with strength because of it. Yet, what was as noticeable as the absence of any physical remains was a seeming desire to bury this history. Both areas are without those touristic blue plaques, reserved for authors of note, poets, pop musicians and sculptors few have even heard of. Some of those had long lasting effects on our future, some were mere fleeting visits of Any Warhol styled fame. The Work House’s are more than that, they are part of our history. Perhaps we are too ashamed of some of the darker elements of Victoriana but at the very least their locations should be more conspicuously identified.

From there my journey was to head to much grander locations in the direction of Buckingham Palace and to Ebury Square, a home in which an ancestor had lived along with several other large families at the turn of the century. I wanted to feel what life would have been like for her. Ebury Square close to the famous Eaton Place had been high quality housing in the 19th and early 20th centuries, surrounded by lush greenery and an idyllic city centre park to relax in, built at the behest of the Marquis of Westminster. Alas, like so many parts of London, parts of it had been destroyed during WWII but I was lucky enough to discover a sketch of the square from circa 1930.

Next to Marylebone, Hayes Place and for a personal trip to Hamilton Terrace. My 2 x Maternal Great Grandfather’s family had been educated at home by a Governess who was educated herself in Hamilton Terrace, Marylebone. By the time I arrived in Marylebone, the light was failing me and as you can see from my images, this was affecting the quality of my photography. None the less, I persevered and I think that Hayes Place threw up some good results, the next street to Hayes Place for example with the pub on the corner, is a classic example of how Victorian life would have looked in the area, as is too, the cobbled street of Hamilton Close. My image of Hamilton Terrace can only show the scale of the school that housed 17 scholar boarders, a number of teachers and maids and is now sub divided into 2 homes. I think it looks pretty impressive.
From then on , it was a slow walk back to Kings Cross to get the last train home.

It’s been a long, fulfilling and successful day, with many new stones being unturned but no matter what the outcome, one thing is certain, ancestry is in every path we walk. I have the blisters to prove that !

See Images Here

For more information about how I can help you with your family search, please contact me


An experienced former Government Researcher and Investigator (UK) offering specialist services to descendants of families originating in the United Kingdom. Offering a special emphasis on Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and Lancashire, I can research your ancestors from any region of England, Scotland and Wales providing all available personal details for your family tree. As well as being a member of the Society of Genealogists, I am also a member of several other UK based Family History Societies.
For more information Family Tree Services or any other Family History advice, please contact me. danny.billington

 

Marriage in Marylebone – A Dickens Tale.

Parish Church of St Marylebone

On 13th March 1872, Hubert Brackenbury, an Inn Keeper of Horbling in Lincolnshire, England married Tailors daughter Dorothy Sophia Short in St Marylebone Parish Church, the church after which Marylebone is named. Curiosity caused me to visit this church and find out a little about its history.

The Parish Church situated close to Baker Street, the home to Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, is in what would have been a thriving part of High Society Victorian London, yet close enough to the tranquillity of one of the City’s green areas; Regent’s Park. Noticeable too, are the many renowned public schools and colleges in the immediate area, in fact The Royal Academy of Music, Britain’s oldest degree-granting music school has been opposite the church since 1822. The world renowned ‘Harley Street’ is also in the same vicinity, and listed amongst it’s notable former inhabitants are Lionel Logue who successfully treated King George VI, who had a pronounced stuttering and who has since been depicted in the film ‘ The King’s Speech’

Marylebone was simply the type of place, you could imagine from the writings of Charles Dickens, who lived in nearby Devonshire Terrace. The Author, though born near Portsmouth, lived in Marylebone for some time and his son was baptised in this church. The ceremony is described by in his novel “Dombey and Son” and many of the characters in the novel ‘David Copperfield’ are said to be based on well-known persons then living in Marylebone.

A Rake's Progress V: The Rake marrying an Old Woman By: William Hogarth (1697 - 1764)

Though the Church has had three reconstructions, it has stood in the same location for centuries, and many famous persons from British history have walked the same path as Hubert and Dorothy, including the great Author and Philosopher; Sir Francis Bacon, who was married there in 1606. 18th century artist William Hogarth immortalised the church in the marriage scene from his famous series “A Rake’s Progress. Whilst Poet’s, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett were also married there in 1846 and the scene in the film ‘The Barrett’s of Wimpole Street’ was shot on location in the St Marylebone Parish Church.

This area of London has certainly been paved with the romance and artistry of musical and literary genius of by gone days, and just as many historic churches across the world, you never know in who’s footsteps your ancestors have followed.

Further Information about Hubert and his family can be viewed here

Images from this trip can be viewed here .

This week I am heading to London’s Camden Town to discover ‘A Mayor in the Family’ look out for images on Flickr

For more information Family Tree Services or any other Family History advice, please contact me. danny.billington

 

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